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Friday, February 13, 2015

NEW PRODUCT – Hackaday Omnibus – 2014

NEW PRODUCT – Hackaday Omnibus – 2014 “Print is dead. Being dead never stopped us from loving something.” – Mike Szczys, mananging editor, Hackaday. The Hackaday Omnibus is eighty full-color pages containing long-form original content from Hackaday in 2014. The articles cover some of the high points from the year such as communicating with long-absent […]



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Update your Raspbian SD cards for the Raspberry Pi 2 with just four commands #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi

Thorin Klosowski from Lifehacker shares four simple commands to update your Raspbian SD cards for the Raspberry Pi 2. The Raspberry Pi 2 is a serious upgrade over older versions, and that means you’ll need to update a lot of your software to use it. You could make a whole new SD card, but if […]



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The Bad Cop Database

The largest organization of public defenders in the country is building a “cop accountability” database, aimed at helping defense attorneys question the credibility of police officers in court. The database was created by the Legal Aid Society, a New York–based nonprofit that represents an average of 230,000 people per year with a staff of more than 650 lawyers. The database already contains information about accusations of wrongdoing against some 3,000 NYPD officers, and is being used regularly by Legal Aid lawyers. The ambition behind the project is to create a clearinghouse for records of police misconduct—something the NYPD itself does not make public—and to share it with defense lawyers all over the city, including those who do not work for Legal Aid.






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David Carr’s First Big Scoop

David Carr was in his mid-20s when he took his first big step on the path that would eventually lead him to the New York Times. It was 1982. Carr, who died Thursday at age 58, was living in his hometown of Minneapolis when he heard a story about two black men getting arrested and beaten up by the cops. When a third man, who was standing nearby, asked the officers what they were doing, they came over and beat him up too. Carr’s source on this story was his dad, who was friends with the witness who’d dared to speak out and who had ended up in the hospital for his efforts. Carr decided to look into the event, interview everybody involved, and write it as a blockbuster about police brutality.






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The Work

Listen to Wes Moore discuss his new book, The Work: My Search for a Life That Matters , and take questions from the audience. Recorded Jan. 26, 2015.






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Rugby World Cup could use Hawk-Eye after trials are announced

• Pro12 matches will trial technology ahead of autumn tournament

• Improving player welfare a key objective of possible introduction

• George North’s ‘concussion issue’ highlights gap still to be closed

• Mike Selvey: How Hawk-Eye won me over

The upcoming Rugby World Cup could see the use of Hawk-Eye after the sport’s international governing body announced on Friday that it will trial the technology later this month with the intention of using it at the autumn event.


And a key objective of the trial is to determine if Hawk-Eye can enhance player welfare, a pertinent issue given the furore surrounding Wales’s decision not to replace George North after he suffered two head injuries in their Six Nations defeat to England at the Millennium Stadium last week.


Related: Italy’s situation is serious in the Six Nations and Pro12 | Dean Ryan


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Teenage driver in Bath tipper truck crash passed test five days earlier

Phillip Potter, 19, was behind wheel of truck that apparently careered out of control on steep hill, killing four people


The driver behind the wheel of a runaway tipper truck involved in a collision that killed four people including a four-year-old girl was a teenager who had celebrated passing his HGV licence test just five days earlier.


Phillip Potter, 19, posted an image on his Facebook page on Wednesday last week of himself standing proudly in front of a lorry holding his licence, and received the congratulations of friends and relatives.


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Royal Ballet School's future stars could be made in Dagenham

In east London, boys on the Primary Steps outreach programme often have to overcome prejudice at the same time as perfecting their technique


Benny Osei-Yeboah is nine years old and he loves ballet. When he dances, he says it makes him feel like he can do anything. But hedoesn’t tell his friends at school because he’s worried they would laugh at him.


Benny is one of a handful of boys – among many more girls – taking part in a ballet class on Tuesday night in a tough area of east London. They are all immaculately turned out in their uniforms – blue tops, black shorts, white ankle socks and ballet shoes for boys, leotards for girls – and are accompanied by Mr Marshall on the saxophone.


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Greek finance minister Yanis Varoufakis: ‘If I weren’t scared, I’d be awfully dangerous’

With the world’s gazed fixed on Athens, a former academic with a penchant for leather jackets has taken centre stage. With no plan B and nothing to lose, he’s ready for battle — and if it all goes wrong, he says, he’ll just get back to his book


Yanis Varoufakis, it is fair to say, was barely known not that long ago. True, he was a bit of a celebrity in the arcane world of austerity economics. His vivid views, conveyed through blogs, books, tweets and talks, were the focus of some animation whenever Greece careered in and out of its seemingly endless debt crisis. In Athens, the town where he was born and bred, the economics professor enjoyed a cult following among austerity’s opponents in Syriza, the far-left party that recently surged to power.


When the crisis broke – and before he departed for the ivory towers of the University of Texas at Austin – he was a regular in the boisterous talk shows that dominate Greek television. But beyond that, Yanis Varoufakis was just … Yanis Varoufakis. In a wider arena, he was not a name to conjure with. So my first question when we meet in his office on the sixth floor of the finance ministry, which every finance minister has inhabited since Europe’s great Greek debt drama began, is: how does he feel? Is Yanis Varoufakis, the academic turned neophyte politician, entirely comfortable with his new star status?


Related: Greece calls for bridging loan; anti-austerity protests in Athens - as it happened


Related: Profile: Greece’s new finance minister Yanis Varoufakis


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What a relief to see a disabled catwalk model

The world is populated by a motley crew of weird and wonderful individuals. It’s about time this reality was reflected on our screens and in our magazines

Sometimes you don’t truly realise how invisible someone is until you eventually see them. You go through life presented with an endless parade of uniform faces and body types, barely questioning their homogeneity until, one day, you see something different and realise just how bland and unrepresentative the visual culture that surrounds you actually is. That’s how I felt on seeing pictures of Jamie Brewer, a model and actor with Down’s syndrome, on the catwalk at New York fashion week. She may have been part of a show called “Role Models Not Runway Models” rather than Calvin Klein’s spring/summer show, but any kind of visibility for disabled people in an industry that usually renders them invisible is, I think, progress.


You may be dismissive of the fashion industry, believing it frivolous, sat in your fleece. But like me you are a consumer of images. At some level you must be aware that we have a problem here. Human life is eclectic and diverse and for fashion designers not to reflect that, to rely instead on the standardised body type of a 14-year-old undernourished girl, while simultaneously claiming to be artistic visionaries, makes no sense. How can you be creative and boundary-pushing when your sphere of interest is so small that it fails to account for most of humanity, with all its eccentricities and imperfections?


Related: Alexa Chung and Boris Johnson in New York – stylewatch


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What I wore this week: purple

‘The best stylist of purple is not fashion but nature. Style it like a florist or a gardener, not a fashionista’


Wearing purple is a statement, but not usually one about style. In Jenny Joseph’s poem it is the colour you will wear, defiantly, when you are an old woman. It is the colour of which Alice Walker says, it “pisses God off if you walk by… in a field somewhere and don’t notice it”. It is the colour of goths and glam rockers, popes and bishops, princes and Prince. The Victorians used lilac for half-mourning, which makes sense when you consider the way it always seems a little off-key, among the sweetness of other pastels.


Purple, lilac and lavender were put back on the fashion slate when Miuccia Prada piled her spring catwalk with sand in a lurid, lava lamp shade of violet. The half-psychedelic, half-folkloric 70s mood was echoed at another Milan house, Alberta Ferretti, with purple suede, fringed shift dresses.


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Fashion The Edit: top 10 denim jackets – in pictures

Give your denim jacket a twist this season


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Venezuelan general arrested over plot to topple president, officials say

President Nicolás Maduro said the plan involving more than a dozen people was to attack the presidential palace and other government buildings on Thursday


Venezuelan officials say a retired air force general has been arrested and 13 other people are implicated in a plot to overthrow President Nicolás Maduro.


President Maduro said the plan was to attack his presidential palace and other government buildings on Thursday.


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The new Spitting Image? Maybe not, but Newzoids could be the political comedy we’ve been crying out for

It’s more difficult for a satire show to shock today than in the 80s. Maybe it should claim politicians are honest and hardworking

A show being plugged as “the new Spitting Image” has just been announced for ITV. Twenty years after the show finished its Sunday night broadcasts, Newzoids promises a “biting look at the world of politics and celebrity”. It will feature latex puppet versions of David Cameron, Russell Brand and Jeremy Kyle where the original had Margaret Thatcher, Arthur Scargill and Pope John Paul II.


Can I be the first to say that Newzoids is not as funny as it used to be? During the many years that I spent writing for Spitting Image, pompous critics would regularly bemoan the decline in TV satire and declare: “They should bring back That Was the Week That Was; now that really was hard-hitting!”


The sheer scale of Spitting Image would make it impossible today in the era of low-budget, multi-channel TV


Related: Spitting Image exhibition allows Margaret Thatcher centre stage – again


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Show us your old football ticket stubs

The Premier League’s latest windfall has put pressure on clubs to reduce ticket prices. Attending matches was not always so expensive, as Amy Lawrence illustrated this week with a photo of her ticket stub from 25 years ago. If you have kept tickets for sentimental reasons, send them to us and we will build a gallery to remember the days when tickets were reasonably priced


The Premier League will earn over £10m for every game that is televised live from the 2016-17 season. With Sky and BT paying over £5.1bn to show football matches for three seasons, fans are wondering why the cost of attending football matches is going up quicker than inflation.


Richard Scudamore, the chief executive of the Premier League, is unrepentant about the league’s vast wealth. When asked about clubs’ responsibility to pay their staff a living wage, contribute to grassroots football in the UK and reduce ticket prices, Scudamore said the league is “not set up for charitable purposes”.


Related: Fans don’t want charity but fair ticket prices the Premier League can afford | Amy Lawrence


But for the majority of supporters, keeping up with the explosive finances in the game is an ongoing struggle. It is common for a season ticket to be shared amongst friends or family. Away games, especially with awkward kick-off times for long distance travellers, are immensely challenging.


The Football Supporters’ Federation have been campaigning with its “Twenty’s Plenty” idea, setting a reasonable maximum for away fans. With the additional money pouring forth, the game should be pressed to go further, with home tickets also capped. “Thirty-five keeps support alive”? The slogan needs a bit of work, obviously, but you get the idea. Leaving aside corporate tickets for clubs to set as they please, a cap on the price of a regular ticket should be on the agenda.


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Love in the Time of Science

From evolutionary psychology to microbiology, this Valentine's Day discover what scientists are learning about the rules of attraction



-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com





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Disabled Elderly Decline Sharply after ICU Stay

Seniors admitted to the hospital intensive care unit were more likely to die or sharply decline soon after their release depending on how well they functioned beforehand, according to a new study



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Dating Services Tinker with the Algorithms of Love

How online dating sites and apps hone their software based on user behavior—and misbehavior—to find your true romance



-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com





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