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Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Depression Tweaks the Brain's Disappointment Circuit

An unusual chemical balancing act helps explain why people with depression attend more closely to negative information



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the hypocrisy of religious extremism

No matter wich side you watch it, religious extremism is always using things to justify its own acts. There is no place for self-criticism, just only God rules as they claim to be. Science is one of the first victim, as well as the freedom of speech and the right to criticism. No other idea…

the hypocrisy of religious extremism was originally published on The Puchi Herald Magazine







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Giornalisti piantatela di dire e scrivere “Giustiziato” davanti ad un vile omicidio

Se c’è una cosa che non sopporto è sentire i giornalisti che usano a sproposito il termine giustiziato, sopratutto in riferimento a vili atti quali gli ultimi omicidi effettuati da luridi terroristi. Un animale (umano) che uccide un uomo indifeso non lo sta giustiziando lo sta ammazzando. La differenza è non minore, nella nostra lingua…

Giornalisti piantatela di dire e scrivere “Giustiziato” davanti ad un vile omicidio was originally published on The Puchi Herald Magazine







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MAKE’s Illustrated Guide to Wearable Components #WearableWedneday

MAKE’s special wearables section this issue has an illustrated guide to wearable components: Bodies aren’t static, they don’t have straight lines, and after a while they tend to get dirty. So wearable systems embedded in garments and accessories have to be robust, flexible, and, ideally, washable (or at least removable). Here’s a look under the […]



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Postal Service Unveils New Line Of Stamps Honoring Americans Who Still Use Postal Service

WASHINGTON—In an effort to highlight their longstanding contributions and loyalty to the agency, the U.S.

















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The Best Restaurant in New York Is: The Tenement Museum

The Best Restaurant in New York Is: The Tenement Museum


Caity: Someone at a New Year's Eve party told me they felt we had hit a melancholy streak in our Best Restaurants lately.


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Photo highlights of the day

The Guardian’s picture editors bring you a selection of the best photographs from around the world, including snow in the UK, Obama’s State of the Union, and Kolyada in Belarus


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Israel ignoring deaths of Thai workers on farms, Human Rights Watch says

Pressure group calls on Israel to enforce labour laws after Thai workers tell of 17-hour days and being treated ‘like slaves’


After toiling in the sun on an Israeli farm for 17 hours, Praiwan Seesukha, a 37-year-old Thai migrant worker, went to sleep next to other exhausted labourers in a crowded shed. He did not wake up.


Israeli authorities failed to investigate Praiwan’s death and speculation is mounting among rights groups that poor working conditions on Israel’s farms could be behind the death of migrant workers like him.


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Guantánamo officials faked letter from inmate’s mother who could not write

Ploy was intended to persuade inmate to cooperate, brother tells event marking publication of memoir Guantánamo Diary

Guantánamo prison camp authorities tried to trick inmate Mohamedou Ould Slahi by forging a letter purportedly from his mother whom he had been unable to see for years, his brother Yahdih has said.


The ploy, which was intended to persuade him to cooperate with his interrogators, failed not only because they misspelt Slahi’s name but also because his mother could not write.


Related: Guantánamo Diary: ‘I smelled a letter that had touched my mom’


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Turkish police officers jailed for beating student to death

Ali Ismail Korkmaz died when he fell into coma after being hit in head with clubs by at least four men during June 2013 protests

Two Turkish policemen have been jailed for 10 years for their part in beating a student to death during anti-government protests that the Turkish leader Recep Tayyip Erdoğan described at the time as a coup attempt.


Police used teargas, after the sentences were announced, to disperse protesters outside the courthouse in the central Turkish town of Kayseri, the broadcaster CNN Turk said.


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Damon Albarn and Carol Ann Duffy make Rufus Norris's National Theatre a wonderland

Blur frontman and the poet laureate will each reimagine classic works in Norris and Tessa Ross’s opening year, which will also include new plays by Caryl Churchill, Patrick Marber and Duncan Macmillan


A Damon Albarn musical inspired by Alice in Wonderland and new plays by Caryl Churchill, Patrick Marber and Wallace Shawn will feature in the opening year of the new management team at the National Theatre.


Rufus Norris has taken over from Nicholas Hytner as director, while Tessa Ross is the new chief executive, replacing executive director Nick Starr.


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Countdown timer hints at Pirate Bay return

Piracy site sunk by Swedish police raids hints at salvage in 10 days with new messages on the original site


The sunken Pirate Bay is undergoing salvage operations and could return to the waters of the internet late next week, if a new countdown timer on the original site is to be believed.


The timer, which is counting down to zero, stands at just over 10 days and 11 hours - but does not state what will happen at the end of the period.


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UK should take a lead role in the EU drive to overhaul deep-sea trawling

We should not prop up an unsustainable, wasteful, fuel-intensive fishing practice and an unviable industry that is destroying our unique underwater ecosystem


There is a tendency to think of the deep waters around the British Isles as cold, dark, desolate places that cannot be compared to their vibrant tropical counterparts. Cold and dark, yes, but those of us who have had the privilege to visit and study these areas know that they are anything but desolate. The UK’s deep-sea ecosystems comprise a fantastic variety of life, including cold-water corals, sponge fields, and unique underwater habitats and species.


They are important, beautiful, fragile, and under constant threat from one of the world’s most environmentally destructive and economically wasteful methods of fishing – deep-sea bottom trawling.


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Photograph of Germany’s Pegida leader styled as Adolf Hitler goes viral

Lutz Bachmann, said by German intelligence services to be a target for Islamist terrorists, posted the picture on Facebook

A photograph of the leader of a growing “anti-Islamisation” movement in Germany styled as Adolf Hitler has gone viral and raised new questions about the group’s allegiance to the far-right scene.


Lutz Bachmann, 41, a butcher’s son from Dresden and a co-founder of Pegida, posed as Hitler after a session at his hairdresser’s, complete with a Hitler hairstyle dyed black and parted on the right, and a toothbrush moustache.


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An Aladdin's cave of Soviet art bought on a shoestring budget

An exhibition at Moscow’s Tretyakov Gallery is celebrating George Costakis, the diplomat who scoured the USSR buying works by artists like Marc Chagall when they were still ‘worth less than a pound of potatoes’. The Moscow Times reports


George Costakis’s apartment on Prospekt Vernadadskogo in southern Moscow was an Aladdin’s cave of avant-garde art, full of works by Kazimir Malevich, Marc Chagall, Wassily Kandinsky and many more — all bought on the salary of a humble embassy employee.


Costakis spent 35 years at the Canadian Embassy in Moscow, building up a stunning collection of 20th century art, most of which he eventually donated to the State Tretyakov Gallery when he left the Soviet Union in 1977.


Costakis bought some for around $100 — works that today would costs millions


I brought it home to my flat, with the silver, the carpets and so forth, and I realised that I had lived until then with closed windows


In the 1950s a French diplomat, who was a friend of Marc Chagall’s, told the artist that Costakis might be interested in collecting his work


Some people think collecting is a kind of hobby. But it’s a kind of sickness


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Watch Elmo Interview Chelsea Clinton

"I'm so happy being a mom," Clinton says



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Brooklyn Fire Leaves One Dead and Eight Others Injured

The cause of the five-alarm blaze on Flatbush Avenue in Prospect Heights had not been determined, the Fire Department said.





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Light-Triggered Collar Song #WearableWednesday

Light sensor Star Wars Coat aka Pop it Like it’s Hoth on Instructables: This is a fun project that uses an Arduino Lilypad along with a light sensor and buzzer to play the star wars theme when the collar of a Chewbacca coat is flipped up, and then stops when the collar is put back […]



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Your Urban Legend of the Day: 'No Go Zones'





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Housing Starts increased to 1.089 Million Annual Rate in December





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Dubai Design District: city builds its own Shoreditch from scratch in the desert

Dubai’s proposed ‘D3’ creative neighbourhood is starting with the big corporate brands first – just like Shoreditch, but backwards. Is it really possible to foster a genuinely vibrant district by top-down decree?




One of the most grating trappings of social change in London has to be gentrifying entrepreneurs who treat their arrival as year zero. Suffering from an inversion of Sixth Sense Syndrome (they can’t see local people), new arrivals sometimes insist that before they moved to Hackney/Peckham/wherever, there was “nothing there”. The city of Dubai has, perhaps inadvertently, found a way around this trope. They’re effectively building their own Shoreditch – entirely from scratch, on the edge of the desert.


For me, building a quarter from scratch sounds a bit clinical


In D3, corporations will get to complain they were there first, before the independent coffee shops ruined everything


Many people in Dubai genuinely want to live in a city that offers more than work, pools and shopping


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Daily Star: ‘Proud to continue the great British page 3 tradition’

Richard Desmond’s paper offers readers a free poster as the Sun ends page 3 feature. “As British as roast beef and Yorkshire pud,” says the Star


Newspaper readers whose page 3 is just not the same without a bare-breasted woman on it can at least turn to the Daily Star after the Sun’s decision to axe the 44-year-old feature.


Richard Desmond’s paper, never one to jump on a bandwagon, has announced that it is “proud to continue the great British page 3 tradition”, which it described “as British as roast beef and Yorkshire pud, fish and chips and seaside postcards”.


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Kevin Pietersen bowled for golden duck as Melbourne Stars beat Perth Scorchers

• Batsman was suffering from heavy cold

• Stars’ reward is home Big Bash semi-final

An off-colour Kevin Pietersen was bowled for a golden duck in Melbourne Stars’ three-wicket win at home to Perth Scorchers in the Big Bash.


Pietersen has been in prolific form for much of the competition, hitting three half-centuries, and has continued to make it clear he still harbours ambitions of an England return.


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'We frequently get stared at in the streets': 12 stories about homophobia

We asked our readers whether they had experienced homophobia in their day-to-day lives after a BBC radio presenter held hands with one of his male reporters on a Luton street and was shocked by the casual discrimination they encountered. Those who got in touch told us a range of stories, from stares for holding hands to outright physical violence. Here are a selection of their submissions



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India's censorship board in disarray amid claims of political interference

Spotlight falls on political sympathies of replacement for censor board chief who resigned after ban on MSG: The Messenger of God was revoked by appeals board


India’s film censorship organisation is in crisis after the resignation of its chair, Leela Samson, amid complaints of “interference, coercion and corruption”, and more than half its board members.


On Monday, the Bollywood director Pahlaj Nihalani was appointed in Samson’s place. However, Nihalani’s connections with India’s ruling Bharatiya Janata party (BJP) – and those of the replacements for other members of the Central Board of Film Certification (CBFC) who walked out in solidarity with Samson – have aroused considerable concern.


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What is the world's weakest password? Even worse than 'password'

Security firm SplashData’s annual chart reminds internet users to avoid long strings of numbers, but also sports, children’s names and birth years


It is a sad day for strings of consecutive numbers hoping to be used as passwords by foolish internet users.


The password 123456 has been named as the worst password of 2014 by online security firm SplashData, and it’s joined in the top 10 by 12345, 12345678, 123456789 and 1234.


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Daniel Sturridge’s Liverpool return will see Raheem Sterling take centre stage

The forward has seemed subdued at times this season but with Daniel Sturridge soon set to come back from injury, Liverpool could not only get the best out of him but also Mario Balotelli

Brendan Rodgers confident of reaching final

Andy Hunter: Manager gets Liverpool to close gap on Chelsea

The Liverpool manager usually talks a good game, but let’s be fair, after a performance as encouraging as the one against Chelsea on Tuesday a coach who has faced criticism of late had every reason to get carried away.


According to Brendan Rodgers Liverpool will now have the confidence and conviction to go and complete the job in the second Capital One semi at Stamford Bridge, because Raheem Sterling has benefited from a rest and is right back to his unstoppable best, while Daniel Sturridge could make his long-awaited return from injury against his former club.


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Doggin’ It

Canine athletes would take exception to that expression: Ben Richmond reads through Julie Hecht’s “great article over at Scientific American about dog athletes and how often they end up injured”: Although all but the mellowest of pooches seem to enjoy a good wrestle with each other every now and again, it’s not like these athlete […]



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The Smiths: 10 of the best

From a landmark debut single to the epics of love and loss, here are 10 classic Smiths songs to warm you up for Morrissey’s forthcoming UK tour


The Smiths’ first single was everything you want a debut to be: an extraordinary statement of musical and lyrical intent, in which Morrissey and Johnny Marr laid down a manifesto. Morrissey’s was one of difference: “No it’s not like any other love/ This one is different because it’s us!” and “We may be hidden by rags/ But we’ve something they’ll never have”. It showed his gift for unexpected vulgarity (“Hand in glove/ The sun shines out of our behinds”). And it displayed his talent, despite having long left his teens, for understanding the desperate, romantic solipsism of the teenager (something that would become more of a problem as he got older and as his lyrics increasingly suggested he was not so much empathetic as desperately solipsistic himself). Consider the line “And everything depends upon how near you stand to me”, which was an adaptation of a lyric from Leonard Cohen’s Take This Longing. Marr, meanwhile, raced out of the traps with that soaring, triumphant opening harmonica riff, the dramatic stop-start in the verses and the umistakable air of a man who knew his rock history and was determined to plunder it without ever repeating it. Hand in Glove sounded like a teenager’s heart rendered in song – a staggering initial outburst.


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Fresh supermarket soups: the best and worst – taste test

One is so boring you could fall asleep in it and drown; another is as warm and inviting as a village bonfire. Find out which luxury chilled soups are worth splashing out on


The New Covent Garden Soup Company pioneered the concept in the 1990s and today, most supermarkets sell own-brand fresh soups, a product that, uniquely in the field of “ready meals”, is reasonably reliable (or so I thought). Soup suits automation. Take the right ingredients and the right recipe, and you can produce tasty soup in industrial quantities. You don’t need to be a genius. It doesn’t require human intervention. The machines have got it covered. But did this latest taste test of the supermarkets’ best-selling luxury chilled soups bear out that faith? Were they souper or a pathetic pottage?


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Norwegian Liverpool fans who named daughter YNWA prepare for Anfield visit

• Four-year-old named after You’ll Never Walk Alone

• Mother Eirin: ‘She is very proud of her name’

• Liverpool display against Chelsea hailed ‘outstanding’

A four-year-old Norwegian girl named YNWA by her Liverpool-supporting parents is preparing to make an emotional first visit to Anfield.


YNWA – named after the abbreviation to Liverpool’s You’ll Never Walk Alone anthem – has been promised the trip as a present when she turns five in May.


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Rafael Nadal made to fight all the way before defeating qualifier Tim Smyczek

• Third seed overcomes American 6-2, 3-6, 6-7, 6-3, 7-5

• Spaniard battles through poor form and upset stomach

• Andy Murray breezes past Marinko Matosevic

• Maria Sharapova survives second-round scare

Rafael Nadal had to battle through illness and poor timing on his groundstrokes to lurch into the third round of the Australian Open with a 6-2, 3-6, 6-7, 6-3, 7-5 victory over the American qualifier Tim Smyczek.


Nadal appeared to be affected by something in the second set as he sweated profusely and took his time between changeovers before calling for the doctor early in the third set with television microphones picking up talk of an upset stomach.


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The boy who didn't come back from heaven: inside a bestseller's 'deception'

Alex Malarkey co-wrote a bestselling book about a near-death experience – and then last week admitted he made it up. So why wasn’t anyone listening to a quadriplegic boy and a mother who simply wanted the truth to be heard?


When he wrote a blogpost in 2012, complaining about the explosively popular genre of books about near-death experiences, the evangelical writer and editor Phil Johnson did not know what he was getting into. He was voicing a concern common in the evangelical community about what he called the “Burpo-Malarkey doctrine”. Johnson believed that Colton Burpo, whose story was told in the hugely popular Heaven is for Real, and Alex Malarkey, who had co-written The Boy Who Came Back From Heaven, drew false pictures of heaven in their books.


“No true evangelical ought to be tempted to give such tales any credence whatsoever, no matter how popular they become,” Johnson wrote.


I remember the man talking to Alex and to me, but not by myself. He never really asked me what I thought, but instead told me what monies could possibly be made from not only doing a book, but a series of books and possibly a movie. He reassured me how much that money could help with Alex’s needs. What stuck out was money!


Even if we could make a case for breaking our contract, the book could (and probably would) be back in print with another publisher within a few weeks. So I don’t think that would achieve your goal.


Also, I’m sure you can understand that we can’t break a contract with an author just because someone else – even if the someone else is the author’s spouse – makes accusations about him. We have to give the author, in this case Kevin, a chance to respond.


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The real science of science fiction

The best SF draws on genuinely scholarly research, and the scholars are themselves inspired by the creative writers’ speculation, writes Susan Stepney

There is a co-dependency between science and science fiction. Many scientists and engineers acknowledge that science fiction helped to spark their imagination of what was possible in science (immersion in the genre from a young age might help explain why I now research unconventional computers). And science fiction authors are inspired by future science possibilities. But how do novel scientific ideas get into SF authors’ heads in the first place?


Sometimes, authors just make things up, but untutored imaginings tend not to make the best science fiction. As JBS Haldane put it: “the universe is not only queerer than we suppose, but queerer than we can suppose”. We need scientific input to sustain a rich science fictional imagination.


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Unbuttoned: After a Tragedy Like the Charlie Hebdo Shooting Come the Products

“I am Charlie” T-shirts, buttons, bracelets and sweats flooded the web after the massacre at Charlie Hebdo, and the backlash was swift.





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Is Milk Bad for Your Bones?

There's a rumor going around that dairy products contribute to osteroporosis by acidifying the body. Nutrition Diva gets to the bottom of the controversy



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