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Sunday, December 14, 2014

Inside Wealth: Some of the Rich Collect Art. Others Collect Passports.

The global wealthy are spending an estimated $2 billion a year to secure documents giving them entree into desired countries.





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British MPs to ask to see redacted material from Senate torture report

Intelligence committee chief says he will ask US for missing passages revealing any UK involvement in torture and rendition

Parliament’s inquiry into UK involvement in the torture of terror suspects will request secret material redacted from a damning US report at the request of the British intelligence agencies, Sir Malcolm Rifkind has confirmed.


The chairman of parliament’s intelligence and security committee (ISC) promised he would ask for the missing passages relating to the British security services amid mounting concerns that his group of MPs and peers is not independent enough to get to the bottom of the scandal.


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Why are there so few black football managers?

Despite playing for England and scoring the first ever goal in the Premiership, Brian Deane had to move to Norway to get a job as a coach. Tim Lewis investigates a very uneven playing field


A man stands up, spreads his arms wide and sings: “We love you Brian, we do.” He is instantly joined in the chant by a cluster of zealots dressed, like he is, from bobble hat to weatherproof boots in the royal blue and white livery of Sarpsborg 08 football club. And now the whole stadium, not quite 4,000 people, are adding their voices, culminating in a thundering: “Ohhhh Brian, we love you!”


There is something inescapably Python-esque about a large crowd acclaiming an unassuming guy called Brian as their messiah. But it is especially surreal to hear it in Norway, in a narcoleptic town called Sarpsborg, an hour south of Oslo towards the Swedish border. The Brian in question is Brian Deane, who, half his lifetime ago, made history by scoring the first goal in the Premier League, a header for Sheffield United against Manchester United at 3.05pm on 15 August 1992. Deane, now 46, flies lower under the radar these days, but for the past two seasons he’s been head coach of Sarpsborg 08 in Norway’s top division, the Tippeligaen.


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The best picture books for children this Christmas

Snow, sisters and a delinquent dragon star in the best tales for tots this winter



To get into the Christmas mood, what is needed is a jump-start. And the delightful, inventive, manic The Really Abominable Snowman by Valentina Mendicino (Walker £11.99) looks just the job. The reputedly abominable snowman has three teeth like half-sucked mints but, contrary to his bad press, is a lovely fella who washes in lavender soap and is fond of cherry cupcakes. People persist in being terrified of him so he tries, hilariously, to give himself a makeover (dismissing his efforts one by one: too “street”, too “punk”, too “French”…), leaving no image untried. Who would guess romance was round the corner? A tale of energy and persistence – seasonal necessities.


If what you are looking for is a stocking-filler, you could not do better than the seven-by-six-inch The Polar Express , written and illustrated by Chris Van Allsburg (Andersen £6.99). It is more than its measurements that please. It is a bittersweet, beautifully told, trad book about a boy who travels by train to visit Santa and, untempted by ordinary toys, asks for a silver bell from one of his reindeer. The ending is far from straightforward and for those who have lost faith in Christmas, will have a hollow ring. That is precisely the point. (3 up)


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HP posted a job you might be interested in



HP



Software Security Consultant

Canberra, Australia, AU - Information Technology and Services

HP Fortify Software protects organisations from cyber-based threats to their digital assets by ensuring that the applications they use to run their business are secure. We are the market leader in the fast-growing area of Software Security Assurance (SSA). SSA gives organisations the power to ensure that their entire software portfolio - whether developed internally or acquired through 3rd parties - is secure and free of vulnerabilities that can be exploited by cyber attackers to steal valuable data and cause mayhem.



HP Fortify Software are currently searching for our next Software Security Consultant to join our talented and growing team. This role is an excellent opportunity to work with HP Fortify and the HP Application Security Centre as well as the passionate and energetic team to help customers build, manage, and deploy applications more securely across the entire application lifecycle.



This is a client-facing role which can see you working on client sites as well as HP offices. Project work can vary from client to client however some key activities include but will not be limited to:


  • Scanning customer source code, auditing results with development and/or security teams and offering plans for remediation of vulnerabilities

  • Installing and configuring HP Fortify products onsite for customers

  • Communicating technical application security concepts to customer staff, including developers, architects, and managers

  • Training customer staff on application security and HP Fortify products

  • Assessing and scoping of customer's application security needs

  • Contributing to project planning and project deliverables

  • Customising the implementation of HP Fortify's production and test products

  • Collaborating with Product Management and Engineering to enhance products

  • Representing HP Fortify's technical, business, and professional values to customers, partners, and peers


To succeed you will have the following experience:


  • 5+ years’ experience in software or security consulting

  • 5+ years’ experience in software development using Java, Microsoft .NET, or C/C++

  • Experience using build tools (e.g. ant, make, maven, MS build, nant, etc.)

  • Experience in developing and/or deploying Web applications

  • Experience with multiple operating systems

  • Fundamental understanding of software, computer, and network architectures

  • Experience in the enterprise security or application security

  • Experience in IT operations (e.g., incident handling, NOC, SOC, etc.)

  • CSSLP, CISSP, CISA, CCP MCP/MCSE or SANS certifications

  • A technical bachelor's degree


You will possess the following Skills & Attributes:


  • Highly motivated, competitive, entrepreneurial and attracted to challenging opportunities

  • Demonstrates the ability to work in a fast-paced environment where organisational skills are essential

  • Strong problem solving, analytical, interpersonal, and ownership skills

  • Sound collaboration skills with a wide variety of internal team members

  • Intelligent, self-starting, self-confident individual with integrity and accountability

  • Strong written and verbal communication skills

  • Polished with excellent presentation skills

  • Qualifies for an Australian government security clearance

  • Willingness and ability to travel up to 75% of the time - mainly within Australian capital cities


About HP Enterprise Security


HP is a leading provider of security and compliance solutions for the modern enterprise that wants to mitigate risk in their hybrid environment and defend against advanced threats. Based on market leading products from ArcSight, Fortify, and TippingPoint, the HP Security Intelligence Platform uniquely delivers the advanced correlation, application protection, and network defenses to protect today's hybrid IT infrastructure from sophisticated cyber threats. Read more at http://ift.tt/KgIAWR.



No salary provided



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Huawei Technologies posted a job you might be interested in



Huawei Technologies



VAS Cloud Solution Sales

Bahrain, BH - Information Technology and Services, Telecommunications, Electrical/Electronic Manufacturing

Responsible for Pre-Sale technical support of Huawei VAS cloud solution:

1) Able to understand customer’s requirement, pain points and propose/market Huawei’s VAS Cloud solution to fit their requirement;

2) Act as a technical consultant for customer, provide solution proposal;

3) Able to manage pre-sales activities including but not restraint to SOC preparation for RFI & RFQ & RFP, solution design, technical clarification, BOQ discussion & finalization, etc;

4) Manage marketing and promotion activities, able to prepare and deliver technical presentations and demonstrations to customers;

5) Interface directly with prospective and current customers to effectively promote the solution/product and identify customer requirements;






No salary provided



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How to wrap your Christmas presents

A little care with your gifts can go a long way, says Orla Kiely. You’ll need to start with an iron



When we were kids in Dublin, my younger sisters and I used to have fun wrapping up our presents at Christmas. I was very fussy about how to do it even back then.


We’d collect empty cereal, teabag and cracker boxes and put the gifts in them before we did our wrapping, as it’s always easier to wrap a box.


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Hays posted a job you might be interested in



Hays



Kierownik ds. Klientów Kluczowych – Systemy Automatyki Budynkowej

Warsaw, Masovian District, Poland, PL - Electrical/Electronic Manufacturing

W imieniu naszego Klienta – globalnego, bardzo znanego producenta systemów automatyki budynkowej – poszukujemy osoby na stanowisko Kierownika ds. Klientów Kluczowych – Systemy Automatyki Budynkowej.



Osoba na tym stanowisku będzie odpowiedzialna za budowanie i rozwijanie relacji z klientami, dbanie o ich wysoki poziom satysfakcji oraz aktywne pozyskiwanie projektów. Wybrany Kandydat będzie miał za zadanie przygotowywania ofert handlowych i prezentacji dla klientów, prowadzenia negocjacji, sporządzania kosztorysów oraz wewnętrznej oceny projektów. Kierownik ds. Klientów Kluczowych będzie odpowiedzialny również za realizację celów sprzedażowych, analizę rynku i konkurencji oraz współpracę z innymi działami firmy.






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Overstepping the bounds: how blogger Emily Gould has been oversharing

Emily Gould is the oversharing writer and blogger the US literati loves to hate. But is the pillorying she gets a fair response to her candid confessionals or part of an uglier strand of online misogyny? Aaron Hicklin meets her


“You really shouldn’t read the comments,” Emily Gould was told after arriving at the notorious gossip blog Gawker, in 2006. Not looking at online comments is a writer’s armature against rage and despair, but Gould, fresh from the less brutal world of book publishing, didn’t heed the advice. The rise of Gawker – founded in 2003 by English expat Nick Denton – as new media’s rabid attack dog, with its Private Eye-esque takedown of celebrities and politicians, had been swift and merciless. Gould showed up at the exact moment the site was mushrooming into a water-cooler phenomenon, in which Denton’s gotcha stunts frequently made the headlines. Blowback was inevitable.


A little over 18 months later, exhausted by the emotional comeuppance of “being shady, insulting and two-faced” as she later described the Gawker work ethic, Gould announced her resignation online, in a Gawker post that captured the disenchantment of a one-time naïf waking up to realise she no longer believes in what she is doing.


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Warming up for key changes at the Guardian

Alan Rusbridger’s departure brings the complex system by which the paper chooses its editor back into a bright spotlight

Editing a newspaper can, over time, prove a draining journey. The people who work with you live out their lives – in sickness and health, hope and disappointment – on a stage inside or just outside your office. The news never stops. Nor does technical upheaval. You’re legally responsible, 24/7: financially responsible on a creaking bottom line, too. So, year after year, the paper comes to have a demanding existence of its own. It is your creation, exhilaration, defining challenge. Which is another way of saying that Alan Rusbridger, editor-in-chief of the Guardian and the Observer, clearing his desk next summer after two decades in charge, may sometimes feel utterly bereft.


Alan moves on to chair the controlling Scott Trust pavilioned in praise and prizes. Chalk Snowden, WikiLeaks and phone-hacking on his scoreboard. Count 111m unique visitors online around the world. Ponder who’ll follow America and Australia as busy hubs. Hear the editor of the Washington Post talking about Rusbridger’s “tremendous legacy”. Dust down his Pulitzer before you leave. But his stretching six months before handover is more than enough time for proper eulogies. Ladbrokes has opened a book on the Rusbridger succession already. Perhaps it’s time to get analysis under way.


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Crane crashes through roof as marriage proposal goes awry

Would-be fiance jumped to safety as crane lowering him into girlfriend’s garden for marriage proposal fell on house next door

An over-amorous Dutchman became a homewrecker – literally – when a crane he was using to have himself lowered into his girlfriend’s garden to make a marriage proposal fell through the neighbour’s roof.


The unnamed man hired a crane in the town of Ijsselstein to lower him over his girlfriend’s house and into her garden for the surprise proposal early on Saturday morning, emergency services spokesman Jelle Mulder told AFP.


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Jade Etherington: ‘Slowly, I started to believe that I could actually ski a bit’

The visually impaired skier became Britain’s most successful female Winter Paralympian – then announced she was quitting the sport



If you’ve never seen visually impaired ski racing, it’s a little like the pre-credits sequence of The Spy Who Loved Me, just without the ski-pole rifles and disco soundtrack. A guide carves a path through the course, while the athlete follows at speeds of 60mph a few metres behind. Instructions are exchanged through Bluetooth headsets. Britain had never achieved anything in the discipline until day one of the 2014 Paralympic Winter Games in Sochi, when Jade Etherington bombed down the mountain with her sighted guide Caroline Powell to win a silver medal.


More was to come. Etherington raced three more times with Powell and collected three more medals (two silvers and a bronze). In one week, they became the first British women to win a Paralympic skiing medal and then the most successful female Winter Paralympians ever. This surprised no one more than Etherington, who was born with glaucoma and has a hereditary condition called Axenfeld syndrome, which means she has just 5% vision. “I never thought I was good enough,” she admits. “But then I started to believe, ‘Oh, I can actually ski a little bit’.”


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Muna Hassan: ‘One of us mentioned vaginas and Michael Gove went really red!’

The young anti-FGM campaigner who told David Cameron to ‘grow a pair’ has helped to get the issue on the political agenda this year



There aren’t many teenagers who can say they told the prime minister to “grow a pair” on Newsnight, and got what they wanted as a result. Now 21, campaigner Muna Hassan cringes as she remembers it, shrinking in her cafe seat. “My mum was like: ‘You told David Cameron what?’” Hassan was subsequently grounded – but it was the attention-grabbing moment her campaign needed. “If that comment got people talking about FGM [female genital mutilation] then I really don’t mind, because people who never knew about it are reading up on it now.”


Born in Sweden to Somali parents, Hassan and her family migrated to England when she was eight, settling in Bristol. It was there that she first heard about FGM, aged 13, through local charity Integrate. Doing her own research, she was shocked to discover that the practice was rife in Somalia. “The next day, me and three other girls decided we had to do something. There’s this openness now around FGM, but when we started campaigning, everyone was just like: [she pulls a face of disgust and waves her hands] ‘We don’t wanna know.’”


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The man from the duchy can’t shake off Luxembourg’s tax controversy

The tax deals offered to major companies by Luxembourg during Jean-Claude Juncker’s time as prime minister are being investigated by his own organisation as illegal state aid – and have outraged the nations he is supposed to unite

When did any book I purchased ever get to Luxembourg?” a furious Margaret Hodge, chair of parliament’s public accounts committee, asked the hapless junior director dispatched by Amazon to Westminster two years ago to answer MPs’ questions on the group’s tax affairs.


Before he could get an answer out, she had another question: “Do you have books in Luxembourg?” The answer was no. “So you are telling me that the bills are printed in Luxembourg?” inquired an increasingly incredulous Hodge. The bills, the sheepish director explained, were printed in one of Amazon’s UK warehouses.


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Kellie Maloney: ‘I achieved a lot as Frank. I could never totally lose him’

In 2014 the former boxing promoter revealed she was having gender reassignment surgery, went into the Big Brother house – and gained her family’s acceptance



It’s unlikely that 2014 will ever merge in Kellie Maloney’s memory into the general blur of passing years. When it began, she was known to the world as the pugnacious boxing promoter Frank Maloney, ex-manager of the former undisputed heavyweight champion of the world Lennox Lewis.


As the months went by she was subject to a tabloid exposé as transsexual, which she fought off with an injunction, came clean to another newspaper about the process of gender reassignment she was undergoing, appeared in Celebrity Big Brother as Kellie, and almost died last month during cosmetic surgery in Belgium that left her bleeding from the eyes and with a massively swollen head. She finishes the year in preparation for a final double operation of genital reassignment and breast implants.


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Helen Macdonald: ‘I was feral, I identified with the hawk, took on her character’

The author who wrote the acclaimed H Is for Hawk, an extraordinary memoir of grief that became the year’s most talked-about work of nonfiction



In 2007, Helen Macdonald met her hawk for the first time. It was the weirdest of blind dates, an assignation 400 miles from her home in Cambridge, on a Scottish quayside, in the months after her father’s death and in the grip of grief. In her memoir H Is for Hawk , which is this year’s nonfiction flyaway hit, winning the Samuel Johnson award, shortlisted for the Costa prize and one of the most all-consumingly wonderful books I’ve read in ages, she describes the first sighting of the bird: “… the man pulls an enormous, enormous hawk out of the box and in a strange coincidence of world and deed a great flood of sunshine drenches us and everything is brilliance and fury. The hawk’s wings, barred and beating, the sharp fingers of her dark-tipped primaries cutting the air, her fine feathers raised like the scattered quills of a fretful porcupine. Two enormous eyes. My heart jumps sideways. She is a conjuring trick. A reptile. A fallen angel. A griffon from the pages of an illuminated bestiary. Something bright and distant, like gold falling through water. A broken marionette of wings, legs and light-splashed feathers.”


There could be no more dramatic love at first sight: momentous and unstoppable. And the hawk “fretful” and “broken” seems already to share its about-to-be owner’s atmosphere. This was to become a holding operation – grief a hawk on a wrist. Yet it was about letting go, a life-and-death experiment including the repeated possibility, with each flight, that the hawk might, after all, be the wrong sort of conjuring trick and disappear for ever.


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Douglas Carswell: ‘There’s no longer any point talking about traditional party loyalties’

The former Tory MP for Clacton who sensationally defected to Ukip in August – forcing a byelection that he won with a thumping majority – is relieved at having been ‘true to himself’



See the Observer’s faces of 2014 in full here



Before I talked to Douglas Carswell MP about his year, he bustled me into the debating chamber of the House of Commons in order to bag his seat for that morning’s prime minister’s questions. With a flourish, Carswell put his handwritten slip of paper on the back of the seat next to Dennis Skinner’s, in the eyeline of the Tory frontbench.


It was a couple of days before the Rochester byelection and Carswell, still high on his defector’s triumph in Clacton, was the first and only Ukip member. The great thing about that, he said, was that, for the time being, he could pretty much sit where he wanted on the opposition side. “I’m thinking about edging ever closer to Ed Miliband,” he said with bravado.


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Gillian Anderson: ‘Comedy doesn’t often come my way. I don’t know what I need to do to prove I can be funny’

The actress was ‘predatory and vulnerable’ on stage as Blanche DuBois, ‘coolly assertive’ on TV as DSI Stella Gibson – and still found time to publish a novel

Six nights a week for three months – plus matinees twice a week – Gillian Anderson became faded southern belle Blanche DuBois in Tennessee Williams’s A Streetcar Named Desire at the Young Vic , putting herself through three and a half hours of spiralling desperation, alcoholism and abuse.


In one performance she cut her knee open. “I was literally gushing with blood. It was a bit horrific for the whole audience,” she cackles. “I thought I would pass out, which I then proceeded to do the next day about six times.” How did she keep herself sane? “I got a lot of sleep, markedly more than I usually allow myself to. It was very physical, so I saw a chiropractor and physiotherapist on a weekly basis.”


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How to hack your home: why there’s never been a better time to tinker

As presenter of this year’s Christmas lectures, Professor Danielle George wants us to ‘hack our homes’. Here she explains why hacking – as in tinkering with technology, not sabotaging it – has become a key skill for today’s children

Hacking. It’s a word commonly associated with murky rooms, nefarious characters and attempts to steal data. So when the Royal Institution announced that this year’s Christmas lectures will be titled “How to Hack Your Home”, it seemed almost an act of establishment rebellion.


But it wasn’t. Because hacking has taken on a new identity – grown a Dr Jekyll to counter its Mr Hyde. “Hack” is now the byword for smart fixes and canny contraptions, from home-crafted alarm systems to remotely operated kettles which, 20 years ago, could only have been dreamed up by Wallace and Gromit and suffixed with “o-matic”. And for the University of Manchester’s Professor Danielle George, who will be taking to the stage this year, the Christmas lectures are the perfect opportunity to peel off the sinister-activites label and replace it with a fantastic-benefits one. “[Hacking] is not all illegally entering databases at the Pentagon,” she explains when we meet in the rarified surroundings of the Royal Institution. “It’s something positive, something we should actually encourage people to do, especially children.”


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Ebola diary: burials go on as Christmas is 'cancelled' in Sierra Leone

After a week in west Africa, Sarah Boseley concludes that not enough is yet known about the virus, except that it must be eradicated


• Read the rest of the diary: day one | day two | day three | day four | day five | day six


Day seven


A large group of men, women and children, all in their best clothes, is gathered in the yard of a house in Wellington, an Ebola-hit western area of Freetown. The dresses and headscarves are bright but the faces are sombre.


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Want to know what’s really killing Christmas? Just ask Ben Stiller…

In a tense confrontation over pancake mix, the US comedian admits to inveigling London into a ruse aimed at exposing the hollowness of the festive season

Every year since I can remember, it seems something has been killing Christmas: commercialism; multiculturalism; secularism; or that political correctness of the “gone mad” variety that they have now. This is not a new idea. An ancient cave daub, dating from 10,000 BC, on the walls of the Grotte de Niaux in southern France, appears to show a Neolithic man tutting at a cave child who has ignored a perfectly serviceable flint in order to play with the leaf it came packaged in. Like an elderly Christmas reindeer that can no longer illuminate its own nose, Christmas continues to cling to life, damp December tinsel fluttering in a February gutter. But this year, I feel the fatal body blow may finally have been dealt.


On 16 November, the three members of the shamed defensive tax planning unit Take That arrived in London to turn on the Regent Street Christmas lights. This year the Christmas lights take as their theme the third film in the successful Night at the Museum franchise, Night at the Museum 3: Secret of the Tomb. And nothing says Christmas like a trio of broken dead-eyed tax-avoiding husks pulling on an imitation joystick purporting to throw into life dozens of enormous illuminated images of Ben Stiller’s face, hanging obscenely in the once empty air, a stale and unprofitable space between the buildings, now at last actively monetised, thank Christ. Merry Christmas. Merry Christmas. God bless us everyone.


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The best thing I ate in 2014

From shiso-leaf noodles to live langoustine, chicken mole tamales to an ice-cream inspired by Andy Warhol – chefs, restaurateurs and writers recall the best thing they ate this year

Banana peel ice-cream
Massimo Bottura

Chef patron, Osteria Francescana, Modena, Italy
The other day I saw one of our chefs, Davide di Fabio, coming back from the market with a box of black bananas. “They were free,” he said, “just sitting next to the trash.” Two days later he called me over to his quiet corner of the kitchen. “Does this remind you of anything?” I glanced at the black banana peel on the white plate and then I touched it. It wasn’t peel but ice-cream moulded into that shape. “Does this remind you of anything?” he asked me again. It took me a minute and then I shouted, “Warhol!” I’d found the original mono version of the Velvet Underground’s first album with Warhol’s name and banana peel on the cover in a used record store in New York. I’d brought it into the kitchen a week ago to show the team. I drew my finger across the plate severing the banana peel diagonally. I closed my eyes. Grilled, blackened banana-peel ice-cream with an intense smoky aftertaste and a creamy texture. I swiped my finger across it again. There was something else in there, too, something chewy and salty. I looked closely at the plate and there it was – seaweed. I couldn’t help but smile. I wasn’t eating discarded banana peels but trash ice-cream. And it was divine.”


Shiso-leaf noodles
Nigella Lawson

Writer, broadcaster, cook
I have to be upfront: I eat so much, choosing one thing is what footballer commentators call a Big Ask. But the most exquisite thing I’ve eaten is shiso- leaf noodles at my favourite restaurant the Shiori in London (it’s a kaiseki restaurant: you don’t order; beautiful morsel after beautiful morsel is brought to you). I now ache to go to Japan.


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Strip air traffic control boss of bonuses, says MP

Problem involving computer code written a quarter of a century ago was responsible for widespread disruption at British airports


An MP has called for bonuses to be “stripped” from a top boss after an unprecedented systems failure at the UK’s national air traffic control centre.


The problem, involving computer code written a quarter of a century ago, was responsible for widespread disruption at British airports.


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The best Christmas present? An NHS with no funding issues

The NHS is great at saving people’s lives – it saved Lauren’s dad’s last Christmas. A year later, he’s still doing well – and that’s thanks to them, too


Sign the e-petition for dialysis to remain a prescribed service on the NHS in 2015


Like everyone else, I’m spending the next week getting ready for Christmas. It’s busy: shopping, school plays, friends and family, the last-minute rush at work… What a weird time for the government to launch a consultation on arrangements for the transfer of commissioning responsibility for renal dialysis services from NHS England to clinical commissioning groups (CCGs).


I mean: phew. That sentence alone is exhausting! Imagine, alongside the inevitable high jinks and hold-ups of the holidays, carrying out a comprehensive consultation about passing responsibility for dialysis services from NHS England to CCGs (regional groups of GPs) by 9 January. Everyone is in the same boat at the moment, right? So much to do! So many distractions! Wouldn’t it be awful if the whole consultation period elapsed without most people knowing it had happened at all?


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Low turnout expected as Japan votes in parliamentary election

Shinzo Abe is seeking fresh mandate for economic programme and is expected to get one



Shinzo Abe and the Japanese election – the Guardian briefing



Ten things Japanese people are worrying about before the snap election



Japanese voters have headed to the polls in a parliamentary election that is expected to reaffirm the ruling Liberal Democratic party’s majority, though many analysts were predicting a record low turnout.


Shinzo Abe, the prime minister, called Sunday’s snap election for the lower house, saying he wanted a fresh mandate for his economic programme and other policies. Abe said he would step down if the Liberal Democrats failed to obtain an outright majority, but weakness among opposition parties made that unlikely.


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